Tag Archives: Privacy

Just an FYI – No warrant, no problem: How the government can still get your digital data

The US government isn’t allowed to wiretap American citizens without a warrant from a judge. But there are plenty of legal ways for law enforcement, from the local sheriff to the FBI, to snoop on the digital trails you create every day.

No warrant, no problem: How the government can still get your digital data | Ars Technica.

Your [textbook] reading behaviour is being monitored.

Unnervingly, book apps record data about how we read, including which books we do and don’t finish, how long we spend reading them, and where we give up, if we do. And niftily, that information can be passed on to publishers.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that the same technology is soon to be used by universities to monitor students’ reading. CourseSmart, which sells digital versions of the big publishers’ textbooks, announced [its] new program last week.

Luckily, for now, this software is being piloted at only three universities.  But it is, almost inevitably, coming our way.

Your reading behaviour is being monitored: Part II » MobyLives.

CIA following Twitter, Facebook

Beware the ‘vengeful librarians’ [which is pretty much an oxymoron, if you ask me]

In an anonymous industrial park in Virginia, in an unassuming brick building, the CIA is following tweets — up to 5 million a day.

At the agency’s Open Source Center, a team known affectionately as the “vengeful librarians” also pores over Facebook, newspapers, TV news channels, local radio stations, Internet chat rooms — anything overseas that anyone can access and contribute to openly.

via AP Exclusive: CIA following Twitter, Facebook – Yahoo! News.

When it comes to privacy, librarians watch out for their patrons

[W]e got out of the camera business…

Seattle’s King County Library System has decided to remove all security cameras from their libraries. The reason? Fear that the video footage would be used by law enforcement to pry into the reading lives of their patrons.

via MOBYLIVES » When it comes to privacy, librarians watch out for their patrons.