Tag Archives: Privacy

Joining the Surveillance Society: New Internet Users in an Age of Tracking

From a New America Foundation report:

Recent digital inclusion policies that aim to increase digital literacy of new Internet and computer users, promote civic engagement, and improve economic development do not currently address the privacy needs of new users. This paper presents an in-depth look at surveillance and privacy problems faced by individuals who turn to digital literacy organizations for training and Internet access, including low income individuals, people of color, immigrants, the elderly, and non-English speakers.

These individuals are coming online without adequate skills, know-how, and social support to confront digitally enabled government surveillance and corporate intrusions of personal privacy.

The paper also details the challenges, such as limited resources, time, and expertise, that providers face when teaching users how to stay safe online.

New Internet users should not have to choose between going online and feeling safe, secure, and free from surveillance.

Now, more than ever, digital inclusion policies need to pay greater attention to developing providers’ expertise and capacity to handle privacy and surveillance concerns of new Internet users. Privacy advocates and developers also have a role to play. Expanding “digital literacy” to include privacy education requires that privacy protecting tools become easier to use. Until then, the benefits of digital inclusion are at odds with the potential harms wrought by a surveillance society.

Joining the Surveillance Society? | NewAmerica.org.

See all the data you may be leaking online



From The Guardian

Metadata is information generated as you use technology, and its use has been the subject of controversy since NSA’s secret surveillance program was revealed. Examples include the date and time you called somebody or the location from which you last accessed your email. The data collected generally does not contain personal or content-specific details, but rather transactional information about the user, the device and activities taking place. In some cases you can limit the information that is collected – by turning off location services on your cell phone for instance – but many times you cannot. [E]xplore some of the data collected through activities you do every day.

Just an FYI – No warrant, no problem: How the government can still get your digital data

The US government isn’t allowed to wiretap American citizens without a warrant from a judge. But there are plenty of legal ways for law enforcement, from the local sheriff to the FBI, to snoop on the digital trails you create every day.

No warrant, no problem: How the government can still get your digital data | Ars Technica.

Your [textbook] reading behaviour is being monitored.

Unnervingly, book apps record data about how we read, including which books we do and don’t finish, how long we spend reading them, and where we give up, if we do. And niftily, that information can be passed on to publishers.

The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that the same technology is soon to be used by universities to monitor students’ reading. CourseSmart, which sells digital versions of the big publishers’ textbooks, announced [its] new program last week.

Luckily, for now, this software is being piloted at only three universities.  But it is, almost inevitably, coming our way.

Your reading behaviour is being monitored: Part II » MobyLives.