Tag Archives: award

2010 Giller Prize Longlist

 

The 2011 Scotiabank Giller Prize jury announced its longlist on Tuesday, September 6. This is the 18th year of the prize and a record-breaking number of books were submitted by publishers across the country, a total of 143. This year’s jury is made up of: award-winning Canadian writer and 2009 Giller finalist Annabel Lyon; American author, memoirist and Guggenheim fellow Howard Norman; and acclaimed UK playwright and prize-winning novelist Andrew O’Hagan.

For the first time ever, the Scotiabank Giller Prize invited the public to choose a book for the longlist. The Readers’ Choice contest received more than 4,000 entries from passionate readers arguing their case for a favourite book. The Readers’ Choice selection was Extensions by Myrna Day, a debut novel published by Newest Press.

Bezmozgis, David | The Free World
Blaise, Clark | The Meagre Tarmac
Christie, Michael | The Beggar’s Garden
Coady, Lynn | The Antagonist
deWitt, Patrick | The Sisters Brothers
Dey, Myrna | Extensions
Edugyan, Esi | Half-Blood Blues
Endicott, Marina | The Little Shadows
Gartner, Zsuzsi | Better Living Through Plastic Explosives
Gunn, Genni | Solitaria
Holdstock, Pauline | Into the Heart of the Country
Johnston, Wayne | A World Elsewhere
Laferrière, Dany (trans. David Homel) | The Return
Mayr, Suzette | Monoceros
Ondaatje, Michael | The Cat’s Table
Vanderhaeghe, Guy | A Good Man
Zentner, Alexi | Touch

2011 Giller Prize Longlist – Scotiabank Giller Prize.

James Salter Wins the 2010 Rea Award

James Salter Wins the 2010 Rea Award…

Rea Award for the Short Story is a lifetime-achievement prize bestowed annually on “a living American or Canadian writer whose published work has made a significant contribution in the discipline of the short story as an art form.”

This year ’s jurors praised Salter as “the most stylish and grave and exact of writers.”

via Paris Review

Winner of the 2011 Bulwer-Lytton (author of “It was a dark and stormy night…”;award for bad fiction) contest

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh professor Sue Fondrie won this year’s bad fiction award.

Cheryl’s mind turned like the vanes of a wind-powered turbine, chopping her sparrow-like thoughts into bloody pieces that fell onto a growing pile of forgotten memories.

Winner of the 2011 Bulwer-Lytton contest via Boing Boing.