Banned Books Week, 2013: Talking With Rainbow Rowell About Censorship

A group of high school librarians in Minnesota loved Eleanor & Park so much that they chose it as their school district’s summer read, giving all their high school students the option to read it – and invited Rowell to come visit the Minneapolis-area schools and the local public library this fall.

But there are some who do not love it, not even a little bit, not even at all.

Talking With Rainbow Rowell About Censorship.

The Cost of Censorship in Libraries: 10 Years Under the Children’s Internet Protection Act

EFF says:

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the enforcement of the Children’s Internet Protection Act, CIPA, which brought new levels of Internet censorship to libraries across the country. The law is supposed to encourage public libraries and schools to filter child pornography and obscene or “harmful to minors” images from the library’s Internet connection in exchange for continued federal funding. Unfortunately, as Deborah Caldwell-Stone explains in Filtering and the First Amendment, aggressive interpretations of this law have resulted in extensive and unnecessary censorship in libraries, often because libraries go beyond the legal requirements of CIPA when implementing content filters. As a result, students and library patrons across the country are routinely and unnecessarily blocked from accessing constitutionally protected websites.

via The Cost of Censorship in Libraries: 10 Years Under the Children’s Internet Protection Act | Electronic Frontier Foundation.