Tag Archives: Research

Research fraud exploded over the last decade

A number of studies have spotted a worrisome trend: although the number of scientific journals and articles published is increasing each year, the rate of papers being retracted as invalid is increasing even faster. Some of these are being retracted due to obvious ethical lapses—fraudulent data or plagiarism—but some past studies have suggested errors and technical problems were the cause of the majority of problems.

A new analysis, released by PNAS, shows this rosy picture probably isn’t true. Researchers like to portray their retractions as being the result of errors, but a lot of these same papers turn out to be fraudulent when fully investigated. If there’s any good news here, it’s that a limited number of labs 38, to be exact are responsible for a third of the fraudulent papers that end up being retracted.

via Research fraud exploded over the last decade | Ars Technica.

New Bill Would Put Taxpayer-Funded Science Behind Pay Walls

Right now, if you want to read the published results of the biomedical research that your own tax dollars paid for, all you have to do is visit the digital archive of the National Institutes of Health. There you’ll find thousands of articles on the latest discoveries in medicine and disease, all free of charge.

A new bill in Congress wants to make you pay for that, thank you very much. The Research Works Act would prohibit the NIH from requiring scientists to submit their articles to the online database. Taxpayers would have to shell out $15 to $35 to get behind a publisher’s paid site to read the full research results.

via ProPublica.

Dance in order to explain your research? Yes, why not?

Here’s an idea:  See if your English instructor or your Speech / Communications instructor would allow you to dance in order to explain your research.

You see the American Association for the Advancement of Science has put on the third annual Dance Your Ph.D. competition wherein a Ph.D thesis is explained with a dance routine.

Here is one of the finalists.   Enjoy.

Selection of a DNA aptamer for homocysteine using SELEX by Maureen McKeague

(found via Boing Boing)

Web site of the Week: ProCon.Org

Found via Flickr

http://www.procon.org/

The library subscribes to a database called Opposing Viewpoints that is really helpful for finding information on controversial issues.  However, sometimes it can be hard to think of a topic or lay out your argument for a persuasive paper.  Procon.org can help you.  You can either select a topic from the homepage or type in a subject to search.  From there you can choose to look at the top ten arguments for the topic or delve deeper into the issue.  It even has a page that shows you how to cite your work.