All posts by Adam

Worth Knowing: The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors, via Committee to Protect Journalists

To mark World Press Freedom Day, May 3, the Committee to Protect Journalists is examining the 10 prevailing tactics of online oppression worldwide and the countries that have taken the lead in their use. What is most surprising about these Online Oppressors is not who they are—they are all nations with long records of repression—but how swiftly they adapted old strategies to the online world.

via The 10 Tools of Online Oppressors – Reports – Committee to Protect Journalists.

Day Against DRM Today! via Librarian in Black (Sarah Houghton-Jan)

DRM is bad...

Today is the 2011 Day Against DRM. I stand firmly against digital rights management of any kind. As stated in the eBooks Bill of Rights I co-authored with Andy Woodworth, “Digital Rights Management (DRM), like a tariff, acts as a mechanism to inhibit this free exchange of ideas, literature, and information.” That is not acceptable to me. There are arguments to made for some kind of ideal future with lightweight and invisible DRM, but I do not agree with them. DRM is bad. Period.

via Day Against DRM Today! | Librarian in Black Blog – Sarah Houghton-Jan.

And the Finalists Are…..[Indie Booksellers Choice Award]



And the Finalists Are…..

The Black History of the White House by Clarence Lusane (City Lights)

Contingency Plan by David K Wheeler (TS Poetry)

The Instructions by Adam Levin (McSweeney’s)

The Lonely Polygamist by Brady Udall (W.W. Norton)

Matterhorn by Karl Marlantes (Grove/Atlantic)

Nox by Anne Carson (New Directions)

The Orange Eats Creeps by Grace Krilanovich (Two Dollar Radio)

Orion You Came and Took All My Marbles by Kira Henehan (Milkweed Editions)

The Report by Jessica Francis Kane (Graywolf)

The Singer’s Gun by Emily St. John Mandel (Unbridled)

Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead by Barbara Comyns (Dorothy)

The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi (Night Shade Books)

Wingshooters by Nina Revoyr (Akashic)

via And the Finalists Are…...

Study: E-readers not doing it for computer science students, via MOBYLIVES



College e-textbooks have long been seen as salvation by many textbook publishers. That hope may be misguided. According to a Seattle Times report , in a study conducted on computer science students that will be released next week, researchers at the University of Washington found that, “Seven months into the study, more than 60 percent of the students had stopped using their Kindle regularly for academic reading — and these were computer science students, who are presumably more sympathetic to an electronic book.”

via MOBYLIVES » Study: E-readers not doing it for computer science students.